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Explore the world through artisanal products.

Back by popular demand, the International Folk Art Market | Collection presented by Dallas Market Center returns
during the Dallas Total Home & Gift Market, June 19 - 23, 2019 (Wednesday - Tuesday), offering the
opportunity to directly impact the world’s folk art artists and their communities.

A Dallas exclusive, these master artists’ one-of-a-kind products have been featured in O Magazine and The New York
Times, and are sure to capture the hearts of your customers.

 

 

June 2019 VIP Preview Party

DALLAS MARKET CENTER | WORLD TRADE CENTER | FIRST FLOOR ATRIUM

TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 2019 | 6 - 8:30PM
VALET PARKING AT THE IHDC ENTRANCE

Be the first to view one-of-a-kind cultural treasures from around the world at our VIP Preview Party. Shop a selection of the unique pieces that have made the International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe a major art destination. From basketry to jewelry, embroidery, weaving, ceramics, and more, you’ll discover unique, handmade items you won’t find anywhere else.


International Folk Art Market | 2019 Artists

7 Sisters
7 Sisters
7 Sisters


Company
7 Sisters

Country
Kyrgyzstan

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

7 Sisters

The family group “7 Sisters” was born in Kyrgyzstan. This is a family business created with the desire to preserve the cultural traditions in their work with natural silk and wool. The basis of this craft comes to the sisters from their grandmother, who was a good maker of shyrdaks. Dad, being an artist and ethnographer, is still the main source of advice and criticism of their work. 7 sisters carries on the honorable mission to preserve, transmit, share the traditional arts of felt, to instill all his strength, skill and love. In this craft, the sisters have been involved for over 14 years. They do not stand still, always in the process of creating new products. 7 Sisters has 26 quality certificates by UNESCO.

Abduljabbar Khatri
ABDULJABBAR KHATRI
Abduljabbar Khatri


Company
Abduljabbar Khatri

Country
India

Email sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Abduljabbar Khatri

“I’ve been fascinated with our traditional craft since childhood. In 1992, my brother and I started tie-dyeing professionally, making cotton dresses, dupattas and sarees for Indian markets. It’s very fulfilling that my work leads to a sustainable livelihood for around 250 artisan women in rural Kutch.”

Amna Shariff Jewelry
Amna Shariff Jewelry
Amna Shariff Jewelry


Company
Amna Shariff Jewelry

Country
Pakistan

Email sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Amna Shariff Jewelry

Amna’s jewelry is a unique combination of traditional techniques and modern designs made with the highest quality raw materials. The geometric shapes of her work echo the mythology of the Indus Valley Civilization. She uses numerous techniques to showcase intricate details in her designs. The metal-work serves as a strong base for ribbons of playfulness to flow throughout each distinct piece.

KOKKU Jewelry
KOKKU Jewelry
Andrea Usai


Company
Andrea Usai

Country
Italy

Email sachiko@folkartmarket.org

KOKKU Jewelry

Andrea Usai comes from a village of 4500 people in Sardinia, off the coast of Italy. He learned the ancient art of filigree from his uncle who in turn learned it from his father.

The art of filigree is one of the oldest and most beautiful art forms developed by man. It has been rooted in Sardinia since the 8th century BC. Its magnificent arrangement of delicately interwoven wires has patterns and intricacies more in keeping with the natural world of vines than that of man made jewelry. The complex twists and weaves of its dainty metal work introduce the element of space in what would otherwise be a solid object.

In Sardinia, the number of filigree artists has been dramatically dropping. Andrea and his family are fighting a battle to keep this traditional dying art alive to support as many Sardinian filigree artists as possible.

Blanc de Noir
Blanc de Noir
Blanc de Noir

Company
Blanc de Noir & Co.

Country
Laos

Email dee@blancdenoirandco.com
Phone
415-866-5599

Blanc de Noir & Co.

Silverwork goes back centuries in Laos. Blanc de Noir preserves and celebrates this part of Laotian culture by making exquisite pieces using traditional techniques and motifs with a subtle modern twist. These motifs were once reserved for royal use during ceremonies and for special occasions.

Blanc de Noir, a family owned business which has been making traditional jewelry for forty years. They include the symbolic flower motif of prosperity on each piece as a reminder that for centuries Laotians have been treasuring silver jewelry. Blanc de Noir’s artisans are aware of how important it is to preserve jewelry-making techniques which are in danger of being lost. Today, there are very few jewelers with the skill and training necessary to produce traditional Lao jewelry.

Daniel Paredes Folk Art
Daniel Paredes Folk Art
Daniel Paredes Folk Art


Company
Daniel Paredes Folk Art

Country
Mexico

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Daniel Paredes Folk Art

There is a magical energy that comes from the folk art created by Daniel Paredes, a young artist living in Puebla, Mexico. He is the fourth generation of Dia de Los Muertos artisans in his family, learning to sculpt from his father at a very young age. It normally takes decades before an artist achieves the level of expertise that Daniel has achieved in the last twelve years. He experiments with decorative clay pieces that are based on his heritage and Puebla culture.

He has developed elements that are far more expressive through his skills and mastery of his work. This type of painting is on the verge of extinction. Daniel’s art is whimsical, with a playful ingredient, which sets it apart from others. Tradition is a key to the continuation of folk art and tradition is a very important component this young man’s art.

Desiree Schaeffer
Casa de Artes
Casa de Artes


Company
Casa de Artes

Country
Guatemala

Email sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Casa de Artes

Casa de Artes is a family-run business that was established in 1964. This store specializes in offering the best quality items, in popular art and ceremonial categories from Guatemala´s rich cultural heritage. The store has been managed by four generations of women, all experts and lovers of the Guatemalan culture. The grandmother and mother taught Desiree, as well as her daughter, an appreciation for the Mayan culture. As expressed in several media, including sculptures in wood, traditional jewelry, and the sophistication of the wide variety of the traditional textiles, with their rich history, among the most beautiful handmade weaving available in the world.

Dr.Ismail Mohmed Khatri, Juned Ismail Khatri
Dr.Ismail Mohmed Khatri, Juned Ismail Khatri
Dr.Ismail Mohmed Khatri, Juned Ismail Khatri


Company
Dr.Ismail Mohmed Khatri, Juned Ismail Khatri

Country
India

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Dr.Ismail Mohmed Khatri, Juned Ismail Khatri

Juned incorporates modern socio-cultural influences into his craft. One of the concepts he has been working on is the international minimalism trend that seems to have caught on upon the world in the last 12-15 years. His father Dr. Ismail had a major influence on him as a child. Junaid was very inspired by the struggle Dr. Ismail and Ismail’s father Mohammad Siddique had to go through in keeping the Ajrakh craft and the knowledge of natural dyeing alive.

Juned wants to take the legacy forward but while keeping in mind the emergence of new aesthetics. This interaction of new motivations with old practices inspires Juned to introduce more creative inspirations into Ajrakh textiles.

Federico Jimenez
 Federico Jimenez
Federico Jimenez


Company
Federico Jimenez

Country
Mexico

Email
michelangelo1069@aol.com

Federico Jimenez

Federico Jimenez was born in Oaxaca, Mexico. He works together with fine traditional silversmiths in Mexico to design intricate silver filigree jewelry pieces incorporating turquoise, coral, and pearls. These centuries-old filigree designs and techniques originated in Spain and were brought to Mexico after the Spanish conquest. Handhammered sterling “Frida Kahlo” silver necklaces and earrings are made entirely by hand.

Federico and his wife donated a building and their collection of Mexican textiles, jewelry and folk art to the city of Oaxaca. This museum, Museo Belber-Jimenez, is a tribute to their love of traditional Mexican arts.

Hilda Cachi and Sonya Cachi
Hilda Cachi and Sonya Cachi
Hilda Cachi and Sonya Cachi


Company
Cachi Jewelry

Country
Peru

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Cachi Jewelry

Hilda Yupanqui learned to be a silversmith from her father. As a child growing up in Cusco, she learned to weigh and cut silver, to sand stone and fire clay. For 44 years, her family has designed and created jewelry inspired by the cultures embedded in her native Peru. She describes her work with silver, stones, glass, and hand painting as a melding of styles: Incan mystic, Spanish Baroque, and international modern.

With stores in Lima and Cusco, Joyas Cachi employs 22 artisans in her family’s workshop. Sales of her products provide her family members and employees with job security, but her work represents more than just income: she is committed to educating her community not just in jewelry-making, but also in the deeply-rooted histories and complex aesthetics she incorporates. The jewelry sometimes showcases seeds or marine needles and shells, so each piece is not only handcrafted and distinctive, but wholly organic. From designing the piece to shaping and molding silver and clay, from planing the stone to polishing the finished jewel, Joyas Cachi is devoted to the fusion of tradition and modernity. “My art is designed for everyday people of all ages, to highlight anyone’s beauty,” Hilda says.

Finatur Design
Finatur Design
Finatur Design

Company
Finatur Design

Country
Colombia

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Finatur Design

At Finatur Design by Magno Caterino we are committed with preserving our traditions, Colombia has a richness in culture, full of diversity and when we think about design and craftsmanship, our history goes back to 5,000 years ago. Ancient cultures have inherited generations after generation their techniques and patterns to represent a wide range of beliefs and cosmogony. Located in a remote and rugged area, relatively isolated.

The history of the Zenu culture dates-back-to pre-Hispanic times. Since that time, the Zenu have been master weavers, using a local species of grass called arrow cane or caña flecha. The mastery of this craft is what has saved them from the armed conflict, poverty and neglect that has affected many indigenous people of Latin America.

Bhairvis Chikan
Bhairvis Chikan
Bhairvis Chikan


Company
Bhairvis Chikan

Country
India

Email sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Bhairvis Chikan

“This is the journey of the white thread culminating into a product that spells sheer ecstasy.” Bhairvis Chikan is the story of hundreds of craftswomen, who, without any formal education, have continued the skills that are inherent in their culture. Lucknow, India, where the women call home, is the epicenter for chikankari embroidery. Approximately 340 women are engaged in the embroidery process. The designs are printed on hand woven fabric using wooden printing blocks and brought to life by these craftswomen with the help of the 36 different stitches.

Much of the knowledge of how to produce this art was lost in the second half of the 20th century. Bhairvis Chikan started in 1998, has not only revived the craft but also changed the lives of the women in this region. These women use their earnings to send their daughters to school, pay for their families’ medical expenses, install hand pumps in their homes, and enjoy much more respect and understanding from their community. They are self-sufficient.

Tahiana Creation
Tahiana Creation
Tahiana Creation

Company
Tahiana Creation

Country
Madagascar

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Tahiana Creation

Marie combines traditional weaving techniques with modern aesthetics to create baskets, rugs, and other household items for daily use. She formed the group called Tahiana Creation. After much research and experimentation with getting dyes from leaves, bark, and stone, she can create nearly 40 bold colors from these natural resources.

Weaving and basketry is the foundation of her daily life and culture. Baskets are used for the transportation and storage of food and are especially food safe because of the natural materials and dyes. The core element of this art is the vetiver grass, which is grown and harvested by men and then woven by women. It has a naturally sweet smell that artists carefully preserve.

Moussa Albaka
Moussa Albaka
Moussa Albaka


Company
Albaka Creations

Country
Niger / USA

Email
malbaka@gmail.org

Albaka Creations

Moussa Albaka is a Tuareg tribesman from Niger, in West Africa. For many generations, his family, of the Inadan class, has been involved in silversmithing, with the women creating the leather items, using natural dyes and doing all the stitching and decoration by hand. He and the men of his family are highly skilled producers of Tuareg jewelry. Albaka Creations include necklaces and amulets, bracelets, earrings, repoussé, and inlay with semi-precious stones, other metals, and ebony. Many of the designs are traditional, but Moussa has a long been creating more modern pieces in his own unique style.

Cedi Beads Industry
Cedi Beads Industry
Cedi Beads Industry


Company
Cedi Beads Industry

Country
Ghana

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Cedi Beads Industry

Everyone knows Nomoda Djaba as “Cedi.” He lives in Odumasi/Krobo, Ghana, where he runs the family business he has loved since childhood. “By my ninth birthday my beads were becoming popular,” Cedi says. “Three years later I could not keep up with the demand and do my schoolwork. The solution was to teach my family, most of whom were already experienced bead makers, how to create my designs.” The family business is now called Cedi Beads Industry, and Cedi is one of the best known among the famous Krobo bead makers.

His highly original creations are worn by tribal chiefs and are sold internationally as well as locally. To make his beads, Cedi funnels crushed glass into clay molds and fires them in a wood-burning kiln—a process he gladly explains to those who visit his workshop to study or buy beads. Cedi has served as Chairman of the Krobo Bead Society and President of the Krobo Bead Producers Association. He hopes to open a school one day to teach young people about the bead trade.

Omba Arts Trust
Omba Arts Trust
Omba Arts Trust


Company
Omba Arts Trust

Country
Namibia

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Omba Arts Trust

Karin le Roux is the founder Director of the Omba Arts Trust, a registered fair trade organisation in Namibia that aims to support the sustainable livelihoods of marginalised communities. Our organisation has been a key driver in developing the craft sector in Namibia and we have developed many products that are always rooted in traditional culture.

Our product ranges include baskets made with palm and natural dyes, jewellery made from ostrich eggshell beads made by Ju/’hoansi bushman and bracelets made from recycled PVC.

Rasuljon Mirzaakhmedov
Rasuljon Mizaahmedov
Rasuljon Mizaahmedov


Company
Margilan Crafts Development Centre

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Margilan Crafts Development Center

Abdulloh Mirzaakhmedov represents five generations of ikat weavers in the city of Margilan in the Fergana Valley, the most famous place for silk production in Central Asia. His family is at the vanguard of a revival of velvet ikat weaving in which white silk threads are dyed and placed on a narrow loom, a technique that is highly complicated and practiced by very few. The process requires a month to produce just a few yards of fabric.

Abdulloh has created ikat cloth for international designers to use in their annual collections and in 2005 his work was awarded a Seal of Excellence by UNESCO.

Claudio Jimenez Quispe
Retablos Ayacuchanos
Retablos Ayacuchanos


Company
Retablos Ayacuchanos

Country
Peru

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Retablos Ayacuchanos

Claudio and Vicenta, husband and wife, are indigenous Quechua, from the region of Ayacucho, in the Andes Mountains of Peru and work together as Retablos Ayacuchanos. Claudio learned the art of retablo making from his father, and Vicenta from her husband. They and their four children work together to create the magnificent retablos and figurines that everyone loves.

Contemporary retablos are wooden boxes with double doors and brightly painted. They depict intricate narrative scenes of daily life, culture, and history important to the Quechua people. They were first introduced by the Spanish colonizers as portable shrines depicting religious images exclusively. Over time, the Peruvian retablos evolved, and the Jiménez Quispe family has taken this art form one step further by including not only cultural and historical themes but social and political topics as well.

The retablo box is made of carved cedar wood, treated with volcanic ash and painted with bright, beautiful flowers or birds. The figurines are made of a mixed paste that includes plaster of Paris and potato flour. Each figurine is individually hand sculpted and hand painted.

Rustam Usmanov
Rustam Usmanov
Rustam Usmanov


Company
Rustam Usmanov

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Rustam Usmanov

Rustam and Damir combine traditional forms and designs with original shapes and motifs to create the blue ceramics of Rishtan. Made from local clay, this style of pottery has been famous for centuries. Forms are made on a foot-kicked pottery wheel, then hand-painted and glazed with metal oxide.

When the collapse of the Soviet Union closed the local factory in 1998, Rustam, who designed patterns there, continued production in his home workshop. He draws inspiration from natural shapes, flowers, and calligraphy, and he is known for the richness and precision of his patterns.

Sanjar Nazarov
Sanjar Nazarov
Sanjar Nazarov


Company
Sanjar Nazarov

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Sanjar Nazarov

Third-generation master embroiderer Sanjar Ravshanovich Nazarov grew up watching artists— in this case, his father and grandfather—at work. Today, with his own team of artisans and apprentices, Nazarov runs a large workshop in historic Bukhara, Uzbekistan.

His birthplace offers myriad sources of creative inspiration, and also encourages him to maintain the gorgeously unique, centuries-old embroidery practices which make Uzbek textile artists so renowned.

Shavkiddin Kamalov
Shavkiddin Kamalov
Shavkiddin Kamalov


Company
Shavkiddin Kamalov

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Shavkiddin Kamalov

Shavkiddin Kamalov lives and works in the ancient city of Bukhara, Uzbekistan, where since childhood he learned his family’s historic occupation of blacksmithing. Kamalov, together with his relatives, operates the Blacksmith’s Museum in the neighborhood of Kulyuta Caravansarai, with the aim of preserving Bukharan handicraft. He and his team of artisans produce items that have both practical and aesthetic applications, like scissors with elaborately configured bird forms. It’s usable artwork of the highest caliber.

Sufiyan Ismail Khatri
Sufiyan Ismail Khatri
Sufiyan Ismail Khatri


Company
Sufiyan Ismail Khatri

Country
India

Email
sachiko@folkartmarket.org

Sufiyan Ismail Khatri

Sufiyan Ismail Khatri is a 10th generation artisan whose family has been involved in the art of Ajrakh printing since the 15th century. The craft of Ajrakh hand-block printing and natural dyeing, is more than 4000 years old and is practiced by Khatri community of Kutch and Sindh. Sufiyan’s textiles are distinguished by jewel-like colors and geometric, floral and architectural patterns. The cloth is made in a 16-step process and requires a high level of skill and concentration.

As a child he grew up listening to lots of stories about Ajrakh, it’s traditions and philosophy. He got involved with the craft by the time he was 14 years old as an apprentice to his grandfather, who’s shaped his thinking and understanding of the craft. He taught him to learn and enjoy the process of Ajrakh art, and to place importance in engaging with the craft and with the person/designer working with,rather than on mere end transactional value. For Sufiyan and his community, Ajrakh is a way of life. Working in the Ajrakh craft workshops, not only gradually leads to increase in important skills, but also acts as an important medium of education, nourishment and philosophy; and also a great chance to become an entrepreneur depending on how well an artisan can imbibe the Ajrakh techniques. So it’s very important for the Khatri community that the craft sustains by bringing in a fine balance between production(business), quality and innovation.

Syeda M. Bibii
Poetic Threads of Pakistan
Poetic Threads of Pakistan


Company
Poetic Threads of Pakistan

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
poeticthreads@ymail.com

Poetic Threads of Pakistan

Poetic Threads of Pakistan, a registered social enterprise, works with artisans from the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan to build sustainable livelihoods and preserve cultural handcrafting traditions. Located along the Afghan border, the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region is generally represented in mainstream media as a site of ongoing conflict and instability. Poetic Threads aims to present a different face of residents’ social lives by highlighting the area’s ancient, rich and dynamic culture. Through their work with individual artisans, women’s cooperatives and local organizations, Poetic Threads helps empower the local residents affected by conflict, social and economic instability, and promote intercultural dialogue on an international level while maintaining their commitment to ethical business practices.

- Right-livelihood of traditional artisans through fair-trade practices
- Sustainable solutions to alleviate poverty in post-conflict areas
- Raising awareness of home-based women workers’ rights
- Product development, vocational training & marketing solutions

International Folk Art Market | Collection
Dallas Total Home & Gift Market

June 19 - 23, 2019
Learn More
Explore the world through artisanal products including embroidered textiles, basketry, ceramics, beaded jewelry, painted wood objects, tie-dye scarves, hand-woven silks and clothing. Many goods are handcrafted through processes passed down from generation to generation. The proceeds directly transform lives provide year-round income, and create a lasting economic impact on their communities.