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Explore the world through artisanal products.

Back by popular demand, the International Folk Art Market | Collection presented by Dallas Market Center returns
during the Dallas Total Home & Gift Market, June 20 - 24, 2018 (Wednesday – Sunday), offering the
opportunity to directly impact the world’s folk art artists and their communities.

A Dallas exclusive, these master artists’ one-of-a-kind products have been featured in O Magazine and The New York
Times, and are sure to capture the hearts of your customers.

 

 

DALLAS MARKET CENTER | WORLD TRADE CENTER | FIRST FLOOR ATRIUM

TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2018 | 6 - 8:30PM
VALET PARKING AT THE IHDC ENTRANCE

Be the first to view one-of-a-kind cultural treasures from around the world at our VIP Preview Party. Shop a selection of the unique pieces that have made the International Folk Art Market | Santa Fe a major art destination. From basketry to jewelry, embroidery, weaving, ceramics, and more, you’ll discover unique, handmade items you won’t find anywhere else.


International Folk Art Market | 2018 Artists

7 Sisters


Company
7 Sisters

Country
Kyrgyzstan

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Zhanyl Sharshembieva

7 Sisters is a family business that is carrying on a longstanding tradition of working with silk and wool to produce beautiful handmade scarves, clothes and Kirghiz felt carpets.

The tradition was passed down to the women from their father who was a well-known Kirghiz artist and still helps in the business as an advisor and a ‘spiritual’ guide. He teaches his daughters the importance of capturing the spirit of their people in the work they do. From an early age, the sisters were engaged in this creative endeavor.

Their creations are made from local natural silk and merino sheep’s wool. The unique properties of the silk and wool make these products not only durable but also aesthetically appealing. Natural silk provides a pleasant, dry heat and can be worn year-round. 7 Sisters have received 26 UNESCO Awards of Excellence for its outstanding work.

Amna Shariff Jewelry


Company
Amna Shariff Jewelry

Country
Pakistan

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Amna Shariff

Amna’s jewelry is a unique combination of traditional techniques and modern designs made with the highest quality raw materials.

The geometric shapes of her work echo the mythology of the Indus Valley Civilization. She uses numerous techniques to showcase intricate details in her designs.

The metal-work serves as a strong base for ribbons of playfulness to flow throughout each distinct piece.

Andrea Tello


Company
Andrea Tello

Country
Ecuador

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Andrea Tello

Andrea is a fourth-generation filigree jeweler, working with silver, gold, and other metals. She as earned the UNESCO Award of Excellence. Her work is inspired by the symbolic patterns found in the clothing of Andean women. Her jewelry represents her history, culture, and heritage as well as her identity.

She was taught by her grandfather, who encouraged her to love her work and open her heart to bring creativity into her life. Following his advice, she strives to create art that is timeless and true to herself. Through her art, she hopes to maintain the legacy and spirit of Ecuador and to keep the roots of her Andean culture alive.

Artesanias Chilenas


Company
Artesanias Chilenas

Country
Chile

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Artesanias Chilenas

Artesanias Chilenas makes horse hair jewelry and figures using a process is called “crin”. Each piece is done by hand, so each piece is unique. The brightly colored and intricately woven figures include flowers, butterflies, and women holding parasols. This art has been passed from generation to generation for more than 200 years.

Artesanias Chilenas employs 15 artisans in the town of Rari, Chile in the foothills of the Andes Mountains, and is considered the leader in reviving the horse hair jewelry tradition. They are also credited with innovations that appeal to current day customers.

Bhairvis Chikan


Company
Bhairvis Chikan

Country
India

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org


Mamta Varma

“This is the journey of the white thread culminating into a product that spells sheer ecstasy.” Bhairvis Chikan is the story of hundreds of craftswomen, who, without any formal education, have continued the skills that are inherent in their culture. Lucknow, India, where the women call home, is the epicenter for chikankari embroidery. Approximately 340 women are engaged in the embroidery process. The designs are printed on hand woven fabric using wooden printing blocks and brought to life by these craftswomen with the help of the 36 different stitches.

Much of the knowledge of how to produce this art was lost in the second half of the 20th century. Bhairvis Chikan, started in 1998, has not only revived the craft but also changed the lives of the women in this region. Approximately 340 women are engaged in the embroidery process. The designs are printed on hand woven fabric using wooden printing blocks and brought to life by these craftswomen with the help of the 36 stitches.

Blanc de Noir


Company
Blanc de Noir

Country
Laos

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Blanc de Noir

Silverwork goes back centuries in Laos. Blanc de Noir preserves and celebrates this part of Laotian culture by making exquisite pieces using traditional techniques and motifs with a subtle modern twist. These motifs were once reserved for royal use during ceremonies and for special occasions.

Blanc de Noir, a family owned business which has been making traditional jewelry for forty years. They include the symbolic flower motif of prosperity on each piece as a reminder that for centuries Laotians have been treasuring silver jewelry. Blanc de Noir’s artisans are aware of how important it is to preserve jewelry-making techniques which are in danger of being lost. Today, there are very few jewelers with the skill and training necessary to produce traditional Lao jewelry.

Cedi Beads Industry

Company
Cedi Beads Industry

Country
Ghana


Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Cedi Nomoda

Nicknamed by his grandmother after the Ghanaian currency, Cedi had made beads from recycled glass since he was seven years old when he began learning from his grandfather. The process involves crushing glass, such as bottles or broken window panes, funneling it into clay molds and finally firing it in a wood burning kiln.

Glass beads play an important role in eastern Ghanaian Krobo culture where they illustrate wealth and status. Young girls wear strings of colorful beads during the traditional dipo coming-of-age ceremony.

It takes years of work to master this craft and Cedi has received numerous awards for his work and continues to teach others.

Crafted in Kathmandu


Company
Crafted in Kathmandu

Country
Nepal

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Ujjwal Shrestha

Ujjwal learned the craft of paper mache from watching family members create traditional masks for ritual performances in the Kathmandu Valley. The skill of mask-making is endangered, and only a few families in his community practice the art. Ujjwal is training a new generation in this craftsmanship and has formed Crafted in Kathmandu. He has expanded his product line to include finely made paper products, thus employing hundreds of men and women.

Crafted in Kathmandu works to build a market for their products, as Ujjwal believes the craft he practices is an important piece of his cultural heritage. Since launching “Crafted in Kathmandu” with a group of artisans, his community has benefited from yearround employment.

To protect World Heritage Cities like Kathmandu, the unique lifestyle of the artisans who live there must be preserved. The skilled hands and cultural knowledge of these artisan families, handed down from generation to generation, has kept these cities alive.

DANIEL PAREDES FOLK ART


Company
DANIEL PAREDES FOLK ART

Country
Mexico

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Daniel Paredes Cruz

There is a magical energy that comes from the folk art created by Daniel Paredes, a young artist living in Puebla, Mexico. He is the fourth generation of Dia de Los Muertos artisans in his family, learning to sculpt from his father at a very young age. It normally takes decades before an artist achieves the level of expertise that Daniel has achieved in the last twelve years. He experiments with decorative clay pieces that are based on his heritage and Puebla culture.

He has developed elements that are far more expressive through his skills and mastery of his work. This type of painting is on the verge of extinction. Daniel’s art is whimsical, with a playful ingredient, which sets it apart from others. Tradition is a key to the continuation of folk art and tradition is a very important component this young man’s art.

Federico



Company
Federico

Country
Mexico


Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org



Miguel Martinez (US Contact)

Federico Jimenez was born in Oaxaca, Mexico. He works together with fine traditional silversmiths in Mexico to design intricate silver filigree jewelry pieces incorporating turquoise, coral, and pearls. These centuries-old filigree designs and techniques originated in Spain and were brought to Mexico after the Spanish conquest. Hand-hammered sterling “Frida Kahlo” silver necklaces and earrings are made entirely by hand.

Federico and his wife donated a building and their collection of Mexican textiles, jewelry and folk art to the city of Oaxaca. This museum, Museo Belber-Jimenez, is a tribute to their love of traditional Mexican arts.

Finatur Design


Company
Finatur Design

Country
Colombia

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Magno Caterino Mahecha

The history of the Zenu culture dates-back-to pre- Hispanic times. Since that time, the Zenu have been master weavers, using a local species of grass called arrow cane or caña flecha. The mastery of this craft is what has saved them from the poverty and neglect that has affected many indigenous people of Latin America.

Finatur Design has been working with the Zenu people, providing logistics and marketing, creating links with international markets and acting as proud ambassadors of the native peoples.

Gulnora Odilova


Company
Gulnora Odilova

Country
Uzbekistan

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Gulnora Odilova

Gulnora was born in southern Uzbekistan to a family of craftsmen. She obtained advanced degrees, started a family, and worked as a teacher. Reviving the art of embroidery in her region has been her dream, and today she has earned many awards that recognize her accomplishments.

Gulnora taught herself the secrets and art of Shakhrisabz embroidery, a type of suzani. She has revived this unique art form, using once-forgotten patterns. She became the chairperson of the Union of Craftsmen in her hometown and taught these skills to other women. Using traditional patterns and motifs, she designs exquisite handmade clothes and accessories. Her goals are to empower women in Uzbekistan, preserve the craft of embroidery, and add to the beauty of the world through art.

Kartik Hirabhai Chauhan


Company
Kartik Hirabhai Chauhan

Country
India

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Kartik Hirabhai Chauhan

Using the ancient craft of reverse appliqué embroidery, a hallmark of Indian folk art, Chauhan and his group of women artisans start with a piece of natural muslin and overlay designs cut into the top layer of material. The layers are then hand stitched in place. The designs include geometric patterns, flowers, and animals. The effect is clean and modern and detailed and handmade at the same time.

Chauhan’s family immigrated to India from Pakistan, and they brought their needlework traditions with them. Chauhan’s father was a tailor, and the women in his extended family were quilt makers and embroiderers. Over the years, the group extended beyond family as the women artisans, who work mostly from their homes, began to team up and embroider blocks that could be stitched together making pillows, quilts, and wall hangings with amazing detail. His group has worked with more than 1,400 lowincome women in the Ahmedabad, India area.

KOKKU Jewelry

Company
KOKKU Jewelry

Country
Italy

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Andrea Usai

Andrea Usai comes from a village of 4500 people in Sardinia, off the coast of Italy. He learned the ancient art of filigree from his uncle who in turn learned it from his father.

The art of filigree is one of the oldest and most beautiful art forms developed by man. It has been rooted in Sardinia since the 8th century BC. Its magnificent arrangement of delicately interwoven wires have patterns and intricacies more in keeping with the natural world of vines than that of manmade jewelry. The complex twists and weaves of its dainty metal work introduce the element of space in what would otherwise be a solid object.

In Sardinia, the number of filigree artists has been dramatically dropping. Andrea and his family are fighting a battle to keep this dying traditional art alive to support as many Sardinian filigree artists as possible.

Maji Moto Maasai Women’s Project


Company
Maji Moto Maasai Women’s Project

Country
Kenya

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Maji Moto Maasai Women’s Project

This beadwork is fashioned from colorful beads, leather, seeds, wires, and string which are combined in artful ways to make a wide range of jewelry and accessories. The colors of the beads are all symbolic. Red represents bravery. Green symbolizes nourishment and production, and white represents purity and health. Women in the Maasai culture have passed down beading for generations. Girls learn all about the creation of adornments for themselves and the men of the tribe.

This group employs 30 women, empowering them with a source of income and reinforcing the cultural value of beadwork to the next generation.

Manos del Uruguay


Company
Manos del Uruguay

Country
Uruguay

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Manos del Uruguay

This cooperative was founded to keep textile-making traditions alive and to enable women to support their families at the same time. The wool is dyed in small lots on a wood fire up to six times, which yields a rich, complex color. This process injects character and beauty to the yarn, ensuring each buyer receives a truly unique piece.

The cooperative encourages the economic and personal growth of its artisans. Each piece has a tag noting the craftswoman who made it, and where the work originated. Manos, which was founded in 1968, was chosen to be a member of the World Fair Trade Organization in 2009. Today the organization employs 250 artisans in 19 Uruguayan localities. Forty-five years after its founding, Manos del Uruguay remains committed to honoring its members by providing economic, social, and personal development opportunities.

Omba Arts Trust


Company
Omba Arts Trust

Country
Namibia

Email wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Omba Arts Trust

Omba Arts Trust supports the sustainable livelihoods of marginalized communities in Namibia through the development and marketing of unique crafts.

They make naturally dyed baskets from palm leaves found in the northern region of the country. Though suitable for contemporary homes, the baskets are all rooted in traditional culture. They also make handmade ostrich eggshell beads which continues a 40,000- year old tradition of the original hunter-gatherers of southern Africa. These beads are made into earrings, necklaces, and bracelets. Their bracelets are fashioned from recycled PVC pipe that looks like the traditional jewelry worn by the Ovahimba people, but these pieces don’t use the horns and ivory of endangered animals.

Omba Arts Trust was founded in 1991 and currently works with 450 producers in 9 regions of Namibia. The jewelry uses traditional techniques and materials and adds a modern twist that makes this jewelry very wearable.

Retablos Ayacuchanos

Company
Retablos Ayacuchanos

Country
Peru

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Retablos Ayacuchanos

Claudio and Vicenta, husband and wife, are indigenous Quechua, from the region of Ayacucho, in the Andes Mountains of Peru and work together as Retablos Ayacuchanos. They and their four children work together to create the magnificent retablos and figurines that everyone loves.

Contemporary retablos are wooden boxes with double doors and brightly painted. They depict intricate narrative scenes of daily life, culture, and history important to the Quechua people. They were first introduced by the Spanish colonizers as portable shrines depicting religious images exclusively. Over time, the Peruvian retablos evolved, and the Jiménez Quispe family has taken this art form one step further by including not only cultural and historical themes but social and political topics as well.

Salaheddin


Company
Salaheddin

Country
Syria

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Salaheddin

Since 2004, Salaheddin’s Syrian artisans have been crafting finely wrought, imminently practical glassware and other objects in a manner traditional to the region. Though its artists hail from Syrian cities, Salaheddin is based in Western Brittany, France. That’s because the cooperative was founded by Jean-François Vaillant and Isabelle Jouglard, who fell in love with Syria and its tradition of glass craftsmanship while visiting from France as students.

For Salaheddin’s artisans, environmental concerns are paramount, and recycled materials are used whenever possible. While mouth-blown glass items are the group’s most popular items, in recent years, the cooperative has expanded their output to include copper and wood home decor, soap, and felt rugs. Each piece is made to be used and treasured, with many of the organization’s designs passed down from generation to generation—ancient motifs that have been fixtures of Syrian households for hundreds of years.

Tahiana Creation


Company
Tahiana Creation

Country
Madagascar

Email
rootsofearth@yahoo.com | rmalexandrine@gmail.com

Marie Rasoantenaina

Marie combines traditional weaving techniques with modern aesthetics to create baskets, rugs, and other household items for daily use. After much research and experimentation with getting dyes from leaves, bark, and stone, she can create nearly 40 bold colors from these natural resources.

Weaving and basketry is the foundation of her daily life and culture. Baskets are used for the transportation and storage of food, and are especially food safe because of the natural materials and dyes.

The core element of this art is the vetiver grass, which is grown and harvested by men and then woven by women. It has a natural sweet smell that artists carefully preserve.

The Red Sari


Company
The Red Sari

Country
Nepal

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

The Red Sari

“We’re taking cast-off saris that are damaged, stained, and going to be thrown away and reimagining them as something beautiful,” said Julie West, American-born Red Sari founder. They hand felt the saris with wool into gorgeous pieces that are all handmade. This social enterprise is located in Paknajol, a majestic neighborhood within the ancient city of Kathmandu, Nepal.

“We’re taking cast-off saris that are damaged, stained, and going to be thrown away and reimagining them as something beautiful,” said Julie West, American-born Red Sari founder. They hand felt the saris with wool into gorgeous pieces that are all handmade. This social enterprise is located in Paknajol, a majestic neighborhood within the ancient city of Kathmandu, Nepal.

Timidwa


Company
Timidwa

Country
Mali

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Timidwa

Mohamed learned the art of metalworking from his father, who learned from his father before him. His traditional Tuareg jewelry and knives are engraved and detailed with meaningful symbols and intricate designs. These pieces are worn in daily life but also used in traditional Tuareg dances and religious festivities.

Mohamed is the president of Timidwa, which has 70 artists representing Mali’s many ethnic groups. The 30 women of the association work with leather, while the men are metalworkers. There is an annual apprenticeship program for community boys to learn metalworking as well as their traditional role in Tuareg culture.

Yoyamay Textiles

Company
Yoyamay Textiles

Country
Myanmar

Email
wholesale@folkartmarket.org

Pa Mang

Chin and Karen weavings are among the most intricate and unusual of all weaving traditions in Myanmar. Every young woman in these ethnic groups learns from her mother the technique of weaving and the designs and colors that distinguish their families. These weavers are now working in cooperatives that promote sericulture and traditional textile methods.

Pa Mang and Khun Shwe, both from the Siyin clan of ethnic Chin, established Yoyamay in Yangon in 1996 to create an outlet for the work of Chin and Karen weaving cooperatives. Their efforts at expanding the market for these artisans has raised annual incomes in the villages of Myanmar and supported the maintenance of knowledge of traditional weaving.

International Folk Art Market | Collection
Dallas Total Home & Gift Market

June 20 - 24, 2018
Learn More
Explore the world through artisanal products including embroidered textiles, basketry, ceramics, beaded jewelry, painted wood objects, tie-dye scarves, hand-woven silks and clothing. Many goods are handcrafted through processes passed down from generation to generation. The proceeds directly transform lives provide year-round income, and create a lasting economic impact on their communities.